17 going on 70.
Aggressively done with almost everything.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/

republicannibal:

piertotum-locomottor:

cuteleesi:

kingbard:

cuteleesi:

kingbard:

water-music:

image

Enjoying some dark chocolate almond milk in my favorite cup before work

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it’s the cutest cup :3

i see your cat cup and raise you a cat bowl

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Your cat bowl has nothing on my

Measuring cups

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u wanna go

have a taste of my cat teapot

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Bro, get a look at my

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Actual cat

Biatch please, I have a gang.

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It’s like that Subway commercial where everyone loves Avocados

Reblogged from jessicayuniverse  431,548 notes

curlyfirefly:

elliemari-posa:

potter-merlin:

petrichoriousparalian:

youfightthosefaries:

9 Problems with Women’s Clothing

And the worst part is that clothing companies do it because they know we’ll still buy their products.  But do we have much other choice?

and if you’re fat multiply these difficulties by 9000%

Amen. Also my bras cost 50 freaking dollars! I really don’t want to pay that much for some material to cover my breasts :/

I hate feeling insecure about buying packages underwear when that’s all that I can afford. I’m sorry, but why is it “cool” to pay extra for some lace fabric that only I am going to see? It’s UNDERwear. Why is it such a huge deal?

Someone finally said the thing! The pant sizes are the worst of all. Like seriously.

Reblogged from jessicayuniverse  151,471 notes

phiftycent:

policymic:

16-year-old dresses as every culture and counterculture of the last 100 years

Flapper. Beatnick. Hippie. Hipster. 

In her project “Counter // Culture,” 16-year-old photographer Annalisa Hartlaub captures all the mainstream and countercultural movements that have defined the last 10 decades. The results are a stirring series of portraits that bring life to a century of women, contextualizing how the friction of mainstream and counterculture defined progression. 

Read more | Follow policymic

this is dope

Reblogged from wickedclothes  166,000 notes
I feel so useless sitting here. What can I do to help Ferguson??
Anonymous

decodethefallenmoon:

natnovna:

there’s a bail and legal fund that’s been set up for those who’ve been arrested 

this person is trying to organize a food drive for school kids in ferguson

national moment of silence 2014 (for victims of police brutality) 

share the following: 

videos of what has happened

links to articles

how to make a tear gas mask

livestream link to the peaceful protests

Ferguson Police Department
Email (taken off the site) 

222 S. Florissant Road
Ferguson, MO 63135

Ph: 314-522-3100
Fx: 314-524-5290

Police department:
police@fergusoncity.com

Jackson, Thomas Police Chief - tjackson@fergusoncity.com (314) 524-5269 

Henke, Rick Captain - rhenke@fergusoncity.com (314) 524-5272 

McBride, Dennis Captain - dmcbride@fergusoncity.com (314) 522-3100 

DeCarli, Dan Captain - ddecarli@fergusoncity.com (314) 522-3811 

Nabzdyk, Ray Lieutenant - rnabzdyk@fergusoncity.com (314) 524-5277

Zoll, Timothy Business Liaison Officer/ Neighborhood Watch - tzoll@fergusoncity.com (314) 522-3100 (x.5533 or 5108)

Reblogged from asslicker2002  88,001 notes
ajamae:

faintedincoils:

lovelykeba:

Help the fight against police brutality!

You should definitely do this, but please be safe and knowledgeable about it! Here are some resources for how to safely film/photograph police brutality, as well as information on YOUR rights as you do so:
7 Rules for Recording Police
Know Your Rights: Photographers
Tips for Recording Police Interactions
Please be aware that different states have different laws on the matter.  Check into them so you can know you specific laws, and what to expect if you film the police.  Also check with your state’s chapter of the ACLU; many of them have tips on this matter, and some have pocket foldouts of your rights that you can use to convince the police that no, you aren’t doing anything wrong.

Stay woke.

ajamae:

faintedincoils:

lovelykeba:

Help the fight against police brutality!

You should definitely do this, but please be safe and knowledgeable about it! Here are some resources for how to safely film/photograph police brutality, as well as information on YOUR rights as you do so:

Please be aware that different states have different laws on the matter.  Check into them so you can know you specific laws, and what to expect if you film the police.  Also check with your state’s chapter of the ACLU; many of them have tips on this matter, and some have pocket foldouts of your rights that you can use to convince the police that no, you aren’t doing anything wrong.

Stay woke.